Make No Bones About It

December 6, 2010 at 4:51 pm | Posted in Continuing Education, NAHSL Annual Meeting 2010, Professional Development | Leave a comment

115 years ago, German physicist Wilhelm Rӧntgen first discovered the x-ray.  In creating a radiologic image of his wife’s left hand, she reportedly exclaimed “I have seen my death!”  But as we all know, the x-ray has come to be a prominent, often life-saving diagnostic tool in medicine.  On Sunday, October 24, Derek Carver presented Bare Bones or Finding the Inner You: Radiology Clinical Topics, a 4-hour CE at the 2010 annual meeting in Newport.

Derek began the session by discussing the many milestones and innovators in radiology such as the first use of x-ray technology at Dartmouth to the discovery and use of newer modalities such as CT, MRI and nuclear image body scanning.  He also led the class in a discussion of current concerns about radiation exposure from x-ray and CT, something very pertinent to the topic of airport body scanners now in the news.  But as a librarian, what helped me the most was his description of why a clinician would use one modality, e.g., x-ray over a CT or an MRI – what does one see that the other does not?  And his use of real radiology images to demonstrate actual diagnoses helps me in my work as a clinical librarian to better understand images being viewed by my users in the point-of-care and to in turn find supporting documentation to assist with their questions and treatment plans.

Thanks to the NAHSL Professional Development Committee for enabling me to be able to attend this CE class.

[Submitted by: Len Levin, Lamar Soutter Library, UMass Medical School]

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