Love Those Lightning Rounds

November 7, 2014 at 1:30 pm | Posted in NAHSL Annual Meeting 2014, Professional Development | Leave a comment

The great thing about Lightning Rounds is that they spark creative ideas that we can consider and adapt to our own libraries.  This year’s “Rounds” were again diverse, lively and fun.  The format varied between slides that automatically advanced (definitely a bit more difficult for the presenter) and standard presentations controlled by the presenter.   A sampling follows.

Gary Atwood  from Dana Medical Library, presented “Everyone Can Use a Little ‘Guide on the Side.”  The “Guide on the Side” is with a tutorial for using a database or resource that incorporates active learning.  The guide  which is on the left side of the library’s web page  explains the resource as the student uses it in practice and then takes a quiz.  This provides formative feedback for the guide’s users.   Results  are sent to the guide developer who can then make  any necessary changes in the “Guide. “

“All Charged Up with the Jay Daly Technology Grant”  was presented by Madge Boldt from Rhode Island Hospital/Lifespan.  Madge received a NAHSL  Jay Daly Technology grant to purchase a charging station for her library.  In 2013, the library had over 300 print journals and in 2015 will only provide 6 journals in print.  With the majority of her collection online, she noticed a drop in visits to the library and also a need for hospital  staff to be able to keep their devices charged to use these resources.  Madge purchased a “Kwikboost” charging station that charges a device in one-half hour.    Madge also developed a promotion campaign and a follow-up survey.  Usage of the library since the charging station was installed has increased by 20%.   If NAHSL members have a technology project that they would like to implement but can’t afford through their own budgets, they should consider applying for a Jay Daly Technology Grant. Awards of  $1,000 per year, include software/hardware purchase and other related expenses.  Information can be found on the NAHSL webpage, under the  “Professional Development” tab – http://nahsl.libguides.com/content.php?pid=148095&sid=5069366

Alison Clapp’s presentation “Serendipity… the Library’s Involvement in an Online Journal Club”  demonstrated how we can become involved in a project that may at first seem outside the scope of our usual practice.  After being asked by a nurse researcher for articles on starting a journal club, Alison noticed that one of the articles suggested using Word Press as the platform for implementing and managing the club.  Alison told the nurse that she had experience using Word Press. That became the launching point for her direct involvement with the  nurse scientist, educator and quality improvement team in the Online Journal Club.  Nurses receive CE credit for participating and only articles that the library has online access to are included.  Alison developed the Word Press journal club site that includes information about the journal club, explains how to get started, provides CE information and an evaluation form.   She  also  evaluates the articles that are included.

We were delightfully entertained by Tom Mead’s “How I Teach MESH,” an abbreviated  version  of the presentation  that he uses with the Dartmouth Public Health program.  A cast of notables helped to demonstrate  medical subject headings and the differences in using PubMed and OVID and how terms are mapped to subject headings for better search results.

Hongjie Wang’s  “Medical Librarian as a Fulbright Scholar: You Could be the Next Winner” encouraged us to widen our lens even further.  Ten librarians were included in the 800 Fulbright scholars sent abroad in 2013.  Information on the program is available at http://www.cies.org/.  Females are underrepresented and encouraged to apply.

I want to sincerely thank NAHSL for their support that enabled me to attend another exceptional  conference.

Jeanie Vander Pyl, MLIS
Director,  Frazier-Grant Medical Library
Cape Cod Hospital

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