NAHSL’s Amazing Millennials

November 22, 2016 at 7:59 pm | Posted in Awards and Recognition, Professional Development | 1 Comment

chelseaChelsea Delnero wrote this blog post.  Chelsea won a Professional Development award to attend NAHSL’s annual meeting.  She also served on the 2016 NAHSL meeting planning committee, creating our lovely  conference webpage. Chelsea is truly an amazing millennial!  Thank you, Chelsea!

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I’m not ashamed to admit it: I’m a millennial. I was born in the 80’s, but I remember the 90’s and early 2000’s best. I took computer classes in elementary school. I got my first cell phone when I was 17. Computer savviness and a short attention span? Talkin’ bout my g-g-generation. Some other criticisms of millennials are that we are lazy, entitled, and obsessed with technology, and when it comes to libraries? Well, we are obviously working with Google and Apple to destroy them all. Can you sense my sarcasm? Good. That’s another millennial area of expertise.

I’m not the only NAHSL millennial. In fact, I was sitting with a group of other millennials when William Powers started talking about us in his keynote speech. By his second or third comment, I started to get nervous but thankfully, I had nothing to worry about. He had a lot to say about our accomplishments and ended with a fun fact: millennials prefer print (Ha! We are not destroying books or libraries!). Despite our flaws, I must tell you that we younger folk make awesome librarians. And NAHSL has proof! Here are just a few examples of NAHSL’s up-and-comers:

Rachel Lerner of Quinnipiac University was named a 2016-2017 MLA Rising Star and was the hospitality co-chair for the 2016 CPC; Heather Johnson of Dartmouth College is the Chair of the 2017 NAHSL CPC and has an article coming out in the January 2017 issue of JMLA; Marissa Gauthier of UCONN Health co-authored two (two!) systematic reviews last year and was the marketing chair for the 2016 CPC. Julie Goldman of NNLM/NER is the managing editor of The Journal of eScience Librarianship. These amazing people all presented or contributed to our conference and they are the future of NAHSL!

At one point in the conference the lovely Nancy Goodwin, who is retiring in the spring, approached me with an awesome observation. She wanted to share with me how excited she is about the future of health science libraries because of the people that will be leading the field. And to brag a bit, Nancy is right to be excited; the list above is of just a few examples of the great work being done by newer librarians. You can feel confident that the 2026 NAHSL Conference is going to be just as awesome as 2016!

The future looks bright, but it is important to know this: that our success is shaped by those who came before us. As we will all soon see with the NAHSL Narratives project, NAHSL is a group made up of incredible people who are not only ambitious and intelligent, but they are willing to share their stories –successes and failures—with all of us so that we can grow and learn. As Isaac Newton said, “If I have seen further, it is by standing on the shoulders of giants.”

Thank you all for coming this year, for sharing your ideas and lifting each other up. You are truly an inspiring group of people!

By Chelsea Delnero, MLIS, AHIP

Reference Librarian

Springfield Technical Community College

 

 

 

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  1. As a member of this year’s CPC, I was so impressed with my younger committee members. Personally, I don’t think the conference would have been so successful (and fun!) without them. Truth be told, I was a little nostalgic around them, thinking back when I was one of them – the up & comers. That being said, I am comforted knowing that NAHSL and our profession in general is in very, very capable hands.


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